Tag Archive | bath time

A Fish in Bubbled Waters

Wow!  We are already at the end of our first activity plan from the Leaping Lilies curriculum; Bath Time!  We’ve had a lot of fun learning over the past two weeks….and boy are we (and our dolls) clean!  Today’s post demonstrates how to turn any simple, one dimensional activity (like a craft) into a whole-learning experience.  (Meaning that all areas of development are being challenged or addressed in a meaningful way)

 

On alternating Fridays I blog about the final activity of our current theme 

This week’s Theme:Bath Time

Activity Description: Make a soap fish to use in the bath

This Activity’s Main Area of  Development: Language, creative, cognitive, fine motor, gross motor, social, emotional

O&M’s Ages (at the time of posting this): 2 years + 4 months

 

Lets get started!

  • Make your soap fish!

You will need:

  1. Wash cloth
  2. Bar of soap (oval shaped works best)
  3. Craft foam sheets
  4. Elastic band
  5. Piece of lace or ribbon
  6. Needle & thread (or crazy glue… I tried it for ease and speed – it seemed to work just fine)

Instructions:

Place the soap in the centre of the cloth

Place the soap in the centre of the cloth

Gather the cloth around the soap

Gather the cloth around the soap (Mommy helped!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Secure with a strong elastic band

Secure with a strong elastic band

Cut out foam pieces for eyes, fins and mouth

Cut out foam pieces for eyes, fins and mouth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Secure foam pieces with a couple of stitches.  (I also tried crazy glue for ease and speed - it seemed to work)

Secure foam pieces with a couple of stitches.

Tie decorative ribbon around the elastic

Tie decorative ribbon around the elastic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taa Daa! Finished soap fish!

Taa Daa! Finished soap fish!

 

 

Excited to use these in the bath!

Excited to use these in the bath!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Use this activity to create a whole-learning experience

Language Development:

The entire process encourages self-expression and conversation.  Teach new words as they come up in context.  Make conversation around the parts that your tot finds interesting or curious.  Ask questions that require an opinionated response.

Creative Development:

Have your tot take participate in the creative process (as much as possible).  My girls chose the materials; the cloths, the colours for each of the foam elements, the ribbon and they helped assemble the fish.

Fine Motor Skills:

Manipulate the cloth (folding & gathering)

Manipulate the cloth (folding & gathering)

Scissor skills (cutting the foam pieces)

Scissor skills (cutting the foam pieces)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gross Motor Skills:

Encourage your tots to wash themselves.  Give them instructions that are more physically challenging for them.  (Such as, wash the back of your neck, under your arms, the bottoms of your feet, use the opposite hand)

Emotional Learning:

Obviously your tot should never be left alone in or near a bath but there are elements of bath time that can be used to encourage self-reliance (such as, undressing independently, testing the water before getting in to see if it is suitable and self-washing).  Parts of the activity also help to develop patience (such as, waiting for and adult to do certain parts before they can continue).  This is also the appropriate age to start learning the importance of personal hygiene. (What is it?  Why is it important?)

Social Learning:

In our case, this activity provided exposure to new situations/activities because I am NOT overly competent with a needle and thread so it was something different for them to see me doing.  Also, I’m pretty sure they have never seen a bar of soap before (only liquid).  In story books, the soap is always pictured as a bar of soap and they are always confused when I tell them that the image/drawing is soap!

VERY interested in what Mommy is doing.

We’ve never seen this before!  VERY interesting!

Cognitive Learning:

First there is the sensory component (touching/feeling all the different materials, choosing colours, smelling the soap..and yes, one of them even tasted it, despite my warnings).  It is also necessary to follow instructions (several multi-step instructions) to complete this!  Finally, this is a great activity to develop awareness of sequencing (first, next, last) because this is a step by step process that is completed in a specific order.

The girls really enjoyed using the soap fish to wash themselves but, I chose not to share pictures of the girls in the bath.

 

Want to see culminating projects from Clever Clovers?  Click here!

Want to see culminating projects from Reaching Roses?  Click here!

Get Dolled Up!

Many caregivers underestimate the value of playing with dolls, especially for boys!  However, regardless of gender, playing with dolls teaches children valuable life lessons and provides growth opportunities in all areas of child development.

 

Here’s one activity we did today from the Leaping Lilies curriculum

 

 This week’s Theme: Bath Time

Activity DescriptionPlay Time (Sensory): Using a water table or sensory bin, give your dolls a bath.  Provide soap, sponges, etc.

This Activity’s Main Area of  Development: Emotional Development

Specific Skill: Developing self-confidence

O&M’s Ages (at the time of posting this): 2 years + 4 months

 

  • Set up – Since this was an exercise in developing self-confidence, I had the girls take the lead in setting up.  I asked them to think of the things we would need in order to bathe the dolls and instructed them to collect the items.  They tested the water to decide weather it needed to be warmer or cooler, they added the bubble bath and swooshed it around to make bubbles and they placed towels on the floor to catch any spilled water.
    The girls set up most elements of this play area

    The girls set up most elements of this play area by themselves

     

  • Play – When playing with dolls, children often mimic their experiences and daily routines (this is what makes it a great confidence booster); it provides an opportunity for them to practice and demonstrate that they know what needs to be done and how to go about doing it.  You can see evidence of this in both the physical and linguistic components of their play.
"Time to wash your legs," says O

“Time to wash your legs,” says O

"Close eyes, I rinse the hair," says M

“Close eyes, I rinse the hair,” says M

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"I dry you," says M

“I dry you,” says M

"Get warm in a towel," says O

“Get warm in a towel,” says O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Extension – The girls actually extended this activity on their own.  They decided that after the bath was finished the dolls needed to get ready for bed, so they proceeded to carry out elements of their bedtime routine also.

O brushes the doll's hair

O brushes the doll’s hair

M puts the dolls to bed

M puts the dolls to bed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
**We recently received these dolls as a lovely hand-me-down gift from a dear friend (Auntie A).  We hadn’t purchased this type of doll for them before and we were surprised to find how much they enjoy them.  They particularly like them because they can be manipulated into so many different positions.  In any case, it doesn’t matter if you have this type of doll (or wish that your children never play with this type of doll), all you need is a plastic-type doll whose hair you don’t mind getting wet!  You can even use action figures if you want!

 

Interested in Emotional Learning Activities for 15-18 months?  Click here!

Interested in Emotional Learning Activities for 18-24 months?  Click here!

Refresh Your Memory

Having a well developed Working Memory is a crucial skill that will encourage growth in all areas of your toddler’s life.  For example, toddlers who possess good memory skills can:  remember and follow instructions, apply what they have learned in a previous experience to a new task and they can sustain their attention throughout tasks.  In fact, these examples are just ‘the tip of the iceberg’.  Studies show that early training in thinking and learning skills improves long-term academic performance (particularly in math and reading skills).  Today’s post illustrates how practising memory skills using a memory game can be simple and fun.

 

Here’s one activity we did today from the Leaping Lilies curriculum

 This week’s Theme: Bath Time

Activity DescriptionWhat’s Missing? (Memory game): On a tray, place several items related to bath time (cloth, loofah, soap, toothbrush, toothpaste, brush, etc.)  Encourage your tot to look at the tray then hide his/her eyes while you remove one item from the tray.

This Activity’s Main Area of  Development: Cognitive Development

Specific Skill: Improving memory skills

O&M’s Ages (at the time of posting this): 2 years + 4 months

 

  • Setting up the tray – As a warm-up exercise to this activity, I enlisted the girls to help think of and collect items related to bath time.  They enjoyed doing this!  This is what we came up with:
    Our tray of bath time stuff (you can change the items to suit any theme)

    Our tray of bath time stuff (you can change the items to suit any theme)

     

  • Explain the memory game – We reviewed the vocabulary and I let them manipulate any of the objects they were interested in.  I explained to them the object of the memory game.  They seemed a bit unsure so we did a practice run.  They hid their eyes, I took away the toothpaste, they opened their eyes and I said, “What did I take away?  What is not here any more?”.  They both eagerly pointed to the area where the object was missing.  I said, “Yes, it was there.  Do you remember what it was?”  They both shouted, “toothpaste”.  “Hooray, you remembered”, I said, and I gave it back to them to place back on the board.  We did this several times.

     

    No peeking!

    No peeking!

    Hooray, you remembered correctly!

    Hooray, you remembered correctly!

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Differentiation

If this game is proving too difficult, try this:  If your tot can’t remember what was taken, have him/her  hide eyes again while you place it back in the same place.  Ask, “Do you see it now?”  If not, give verbal clues.  (Ex. You put it on your toothbrush)

If the game is proving too easy, try this:  Once your tot is consistently answering correctly, you could add more objects to the tray and/or try taking two items away  (I did this with the girls and it was a better challenge).  To make it even more difficult, you can take an item (or two) away and mix up the remaining items on the board (so that they are not in the same spot as they were before your tot closed his/her eyes.)

  • Extension – This game was very enjoyable for them, but proving only mildly challenging.  To extend the activity further, I had them play with each other.  This simple extension offers an opportunity to practice communication skills (Language Development) and  co-operative play (Social Learning).  If you are doing this with only one child, you simply hide your eyes and let your child lead.  In the case below, M instructed O to close her eyes.  She took the bath toy and instructed O to open her eyes, “What I take, O?”  O replied, “The hippo!”  “Great job O!” said M and hands the toy back to O.  (P.S. I totally love to watch them talk to each other!)

     

    M hands the toy back to O

    M hands the toy back to O

    O places it back on the tray to play another round

    O places it back on the tray to play another round

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Want to see cognitive development activities for 15-18 months?  Click here!

Want to see cognitive development activities for 18-24 months?  Click here!

A Work of Bubble Art

It’s short and sweet today!  An inexpensive, simple-to-do, art activity using items you already have in your home.  It makes beautiful and fascinating artwork.  Enjoy!

Here’s one activity we did today from the Leaping Lilies curriculum

 This week’s Theme: Bath Time

Activity DescriptionBubble Art: Place some bubbles into a container, add food colouring and mix.  Put a straw in the container and blow bubbles until they reach well above the rim of the container, gently place a paper on the bubbles and repeat.  Use different colours.

This Activity’s Main Area of  Development: Creative Development

Specific Skill: Experiment using different art mediums

O&M’s Ages (at the time of posting this): 2 years + 4 months

 

This activity is pretty straight forward and doesn’t require a lot of pictures to explain, so here goes!

 

    • Mix the bubbles with the food colouring (encourage your tot to do this)

      Add food colouring to bubbles

      Add food colouring to bubbles

 

    • Insert a straw into the container and blow!!! (explain that sucking will be yucky!)  O accidentally sucked in the mixture even after the warning and she ended up blowing a bubble out of her mouth which made  M laugh so hard which in turn made O so happy that she forgot about the yucky taste in her mouth! (We did keep some juice on hand just in case we needed to get a yucky taste out of our mouths)

      Blow until bubbles rise out of the cup

      Blow until bubbles rise out of the cup

 

    • Place a piece of paper gently onto the bubbles/cup

      Place paper onto the cup

      Place paper onto the cup

 

  • Repeat using different colours

    Taa Daa!  Beautiful bubble art!

    Taa Daa! Beautiful bubble art!

M & O happy with their bubble art

M & O happy with their bubble art

 

 

 

AND….  Don’t miss out!!!

Remember we are celebrating our one year anniversary by offering all of our development programs at 20% off.   Use the code: CTM20 at check-out and bag yourself a bargain!! This offer will be available through March 29, 2015.

 

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Exploring Textiles: A Reggio Provocation

Today is our first Reggio Emilia provocation activity! I’m so excited to be introducing this newly added element that is incorporated into our current curriculum, Leaping Lilies.  If you are not sure what a Reggio Provocation is, don’t worry, I will post a blog on Friday with an explanation.  For today, it is helpful to understand that a provocation has absolutely no objective. It is advisable and enjoyable to just sit and observe what your tot does and see where it takes you!

On alternating Mondays I blog about a Reggio Emilia Provocation Activity 

 

This week’s Theme: Bath Time

Description of Provocation: Exploring Textiles: Provide swatches of towel/cloth, pieces of sponge, mini loofahs, stamp pad and paper

O&M’s Ages (at the time of posting this): 2 years+ 4 months

 

Set Up (The display for a provocation should be visually appealing and intriguing)

  • I chose to use a spring theme because the first official day of spring has just passed and the girls have been asking about going for walks and going to the playground.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Materials (The items included in your provocation)

  • Art Supplies: Stamp pad, markers, poster paper
  • Textiles: Since our theme is bath time, I chose textiles related to bathing (loofahs, sponges, cloths with different textures)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Initial Reactions (First responses, if any, to the provocation)

  • Exploring the textiles: M showed interest in this, O, not so much.

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  • Creating a wall mural: They were both pretty excited about this.

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  • Stamping: They used the textiles to stamp

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It’s important to note that I did not give them any direction of any sort.  The provocation and your child’s curiosity, imagination and/or prior knowledge will provide direction.

 

Secondary Reactions(Upon further inspection and manipulation……)

  • The decorative tree: This became a focal point of conversation and interest
M & O discuss the tree and its elements

M & O discuss the tree and its elements

O decorates the eggs, citing a book we recently read

O decorates the eggs, citing a book we recently read

The completion of our first interaction with this provocation table

The completion of our first interaction with this provocation table

 

Observations & Moving Forward: (This is where your job comes in!  After observing and listening, consider ways in which you can add to or extend the provocation, based on what your tot did)

Here are the things I noted:

  • At one point M said to O, “Shhh!  Baby birds come out of the eggs”.
  • As mentioned above, O decided to decorate the eggs as she remembered this happening in a story we read a couple of weeks ago; M excitedly joined in.
  • O also mentioned that it would be nice if the eggs could open and there would be surprises inside.

Extension:

  • Since much of the excitement and interest revolved around the eggs in the tree, tomorrow I will show them a video clip about eggs (from hen to your home, to all the things we can do with eggs).  We will discuss it and see where the conversation takes us as to what we could do next.  -For example, maybe they would show an interest in cooking eggs, we could do an experiment about all the different ways to cook eggs.
  • On the original provocation table, I will add some plastic eggs and/or possibly a couple of hard boiled eggs and see where that goes. – For example, maybe they would decide to make things to put into the plastic eggs as a surprise, or maybe they will want to decorate them.

The possibilities are endless!!!!

P.S.  Don’t forget!!!

To celebrate our one year anniversary we are offering all of our development programs at 20% off.   Use the code: CTM20 at check-out and bag yourself a bargain!! This offer will be available through March 29, 2015.

 

 Click here to visit our shop