Tag Archive | clothing

A Moment in Time

We’ve come to the end of the Clothing activity plan from the Reaching Roses curriculum (which is now available for purchase!…apologies to those of you who have been waiting).  This activity provided a lot of learning opportunity and enjoyment for today but will also serve us well in the future! …. I’m already imagining the fun and educational activities we could do with this in ten years time…

On alternating Fridays I blog about our final activity (starring my twin babies)

 

This week’s Theme:Clothing

Activity Description: Make a family time capsule about clothing!

This Activity’s Main Area of  Development: Language, cognitive, fine motor, social, emotional

O&M’s Ages (at the time of posting this): 22 months

 

1. Get a sturdy box (insulate it with a plastic bag if you wish)

2.  Decorate the box

Decorating with stickers

Decorating with stickers

Making wrapping paper

Making wrapping paper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Insert clothing articles.  Here’s what we included:

  • Baby’s clothes at the time of making the capsule (for size) – we put in the onesies “shirts” they made this week
  • Pictures of current fashionable and trendy clothes (to laugh at in the future!) – we put in a recent copy of Rolling Stone
  • Pictures of your baby  and family members in relevant clothing – we put a small photo album in with the following pictures:
      • a recent family photo
      • a photo of them in their first pair of underwear (we started wearing them a few weeks ago)
      • photos of them playing dress-up this week
      • a photo of them wearing the onesies they made this week (which are also included in the box)
      • a photo of them in their favourite pj’s
      • a picture of them in their bathing suits and water shoes and sunglasses (this summer’s favourite ensemble)
      • pictures of them with other family members (aunts, grandparents, cousins)
      • a picture of us the day we made the time-capsule

We also included some items not related to clothing:

  • a letter from Mommy
  • some of their recent artwork
  • certificates of achievement from the summer gymnastics class they just completed
O adds her papers

O adds her papers

M adds her papers

M adds her papers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adding their "shirts"

Adding their “shirts”

Making sure they're snug in the box

Making sure they’re snug in the box

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

M adds the photo album

M adds the photo album

O adds the Rolling Stone magazine

O adds the Rolling Stone magazine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Seal the box (very well) – you can make it prettier but since we were wrapping ours, I wasn’t concerned with that

Good ol' duct tape

Good ol’ duct tape

Showing how to place tape

Showing how to place tape

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Helping mommy with the wrapping

Helping mommy with the wrapping

M helps with the tape

M helps with the tape

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. Add a clear label on the box that says this is a time capsule created on such and such day and is not to be opened until (insert date)

 

Mr. Y & I decided to open it in 10 years

Mr. Y & I decided to open it in 10 years

All done!

All done!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Store in a safe place

I hope you enjoy doing this with your family as much as we did!  Leave us a comment to let us know what things you included in your time-capsule.

 

This post was based on an activity included in the Reaching Roses curriculum.  Click here to learn more!

 

 

We’re Highly Decorated

Did you know that you can often tell the age of a child by the type of drawings they create?  You can, because there are developmental stages in drawing too (all the way up to pre-teen). In early childhood (up to age 5), there are four stages: Scribbling (18-24 mths), Extended Scribbling (2-3 yrs), Representation Drawing (3-4 yrs) and Realistic Representation (5-6).  Babies following the Reaching Roses curriculum typically fall in the Scribbling stage – manipulating a drawing tool to make marks, dots and lines on a drawing surface.  Today’s activity is a super-fun way to let your toddler practice scribbling! **Please note that was a VERY quick & simple summary of a fairly large topic.

Mondays and Wednesdays I choose one activity we did today from the Reaching Roses curriculum and share our experiences (starring my twin babies)

 This week’s Theme: Clothing

Activity Description: Decorate a Shirt: Make your own custom shirts by using fabric markers and fabric paints to decorate!

This Activity’s Main Area of  Development: Fine Motor

Specific Skill: Drawing

O&M’s Ages (at the time of posting this): 22 months

1. For our warm up we sang some songs and we read the book, Max’s Dragon Shirt by Rosemary Wells.

large_maxs-dragon-shirt_001

 

2. I found a couple of our stained onesies (which we also refer to as shirts) to do this activity.  I explained to the babies that they were going to make their own shirts.  We used fabric paints so I demonstrated how to squeeze and draw with the paints by drawing their first initial in a shape.  I handed over the paints to them and let them try it.  It took some practice for them to get the coordination of squeezing the paint bottle and drawing (perfect for fine motor skill development at this age).

3.  I wasn’t able to photograph and manage this activity at the same time (they kept wanting to dip their fingers in the paint to smudge it) so we only have pictures of the final result, which they totally love and have been showing everybody!

O's creation

O’s creation

M's creation

M’s creation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We love our shirts!

We love our shirts!

Want to see another ‘drawing with toddlers’ activity? Click here!

 

This post was based on an activity included in the Reaching Roses curriculum.  Click here to learn more!

 

We Make a Great Pair!

Teaching toddlers how to match items is an important part of developing early math skills because it helps children identify and describe relationships between objects.  Matching activities also encourage critical thinking, logic, visual discernment, and short-term memory.  Today’s activity is cost-free, requires very little preparation & clean-up and is easy to differentiate (make less or more challenging based on your baby’s abilities).

 

Mondays and Wednesdays I choose one activity we did today from the Reaching Roses curriculum and share our experiences (starring my twin babies)

 This week’s Theme: Clothing

Activity Description: Sock Matching: Get a basket of interesting and easily distinguished socks (all shapes and sizes welcome) – a pile on the floor can work just as well.  Pick a sock and model how to find the matching sock.  Then pick another sock and encourage your baby to find its match.

This Activity’s Main Area of  Development: Cognitive

Specific Skill: Matching two of the same item

O&M’s Ages (at the time of posting this): 21 months + 3 weeks

1. For our warm up we sang some songs and we read the book, A Pair of Socks, by Stuart J. Murphy.

a pair of socks

 

2. I chose a sock and modelled how to find it in the pile by comparing it to other socks.  (We used socks that were easy to distinguish)

3. Next it was their turn to give it a try. I held up a sock and asked them to find the match.

 

 

4.  This was way to simple for them so it was necessary to differentiate the task.  To make it more challenging, I decided to do a few  things:

  • I used their socks (smaller and less distinguishable)
  • I used pairs of socks that had similarities (the same pattern but in a different colour or the same colour but in different sizes)
  • I added a couple of socks that didn’t have a pair

 (These changes provided the right amount of challenge for them.  They had to think about it more but were still able to complete the task)

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O found it!

O found it!

M makes the match!

M makes the match!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That's close O, but not quite, try again!

That’s close O, try again!

You did it O!!

You did it O!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

M looks hard

M looks carefully

Those aren't the same, try again!

Those aren’t the same, try again!

Good job M!

Good job M!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. If the initial task is too difficult for your baby you can differentiate this task in the other direction (by adding more learning support).  Here are some suggestions to make this activity a littler simpler:

  • Use less socks
  • Lay the socks out neatly in a row (instead of having them in a jumbled pile) so they are all clearly visible
  • Take the sock that you want to match up and place it beside each of the socks in the row to show how they are the same or different

 …….while she was waiting for her turn….O decided to practice…..

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Want to see other matching activities for toddlers? Click here!

Clothes Make the Monkey

Today’s activity is a fun way to practice problem solving skills!  As you will quickly see, working on problem solving with your baby promotes a lot more than just thinking skills!  Other benefits include:  language development (conversational interaction), social learning (working collaboratively) and emotional learning (increased independence).  As our babies gain confidence in their ability to solve problems, they will be more eager and prepared to explore and interact with the world independently (and with success)! :0)

 

Mondays and Wednesdays I choose one activity we did today from the Reaching Roses curriculum and share our experiences (starring my twin babies)

 This week’s Theme: Clothing

Activity DescriptionSilly Me!: Get a toy doll or stuffed animal. Dress the toy by putting clothing on in incorrect places (Ex. socks on hands), have your baby correct you.

This Activity’s Main Area of  Development: Cognitive

Specific Skill: Problem solving

O&M’s Ages (at the time of posting this): 21 months + 3 weeks

1. To warm up, we read a book about hats and sang some songs from the activity plan (about getting dressed).

2. Here are the videos of the main activity:

 

 

  • The Shirt! (This shows what to do if your baby does not have the words to express herself.  O&M don’t know the word chest so I ask O to show me where to put it – they both said “head” so I modelled how to say what they wanted to say but were unable to say – “pull it down over your head”.  Then I added “on to your chest and belly” – because that is the actual answer to the question)

 

  • The Shorts! (Remember to repeat what your baby says in order to model correct pronunciation.  This is also a good example of how to work through a problem if your baby doesn’t get the correct response right away.  Rather than simply saying ‘no’, show an example or explain why that line of thinking is incorrect)

…….Two stuffed animals later…..

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Today’s activity was also a great opportunity to insert the activity plan’s secondary vocabulary

(put on, take off)